When will God reverse decay in the Universe?

In biblical creationist discussions and presentations we often talk about the restoration of the Universe back to its original perfect uncursed state that it had before the Creator destroyed the perfect paradise. That Curse was put on all creation and we see that the removal of the Curse is an integral part of understanding the message of the Bible, especially the gospel.

It was because of Adam’s original sin that the Universe was cursed and altered in a way that brought forth all types of imperfections in all living creatures, resulting in sickness, disease, mutations, death, violence and the many sins of mankind.

The usual image used to illustrate this is to show that sin caused the world to be corrupted but later God will remove the Curse and restore the perfect paradise of His original creation. See illustration below.

marred-by-sin

The world now is not that perfect world that God originally created. Death, pain, disease, suffering are intruders on God’s perfect creation. But the Scriptures give us hope, that through Christ, of the restoration of the world back to the same state in a new heaven and a new earth after Christ’s second advent. The world will be restored back to the same state that it once had before Adam and Eve sinned in the Garden of Eden.

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Aliens are all around us?

With the rapid development of space technology, mankind has accelerated its search for extraterrestrial life, especially intelligent life. This has even spawned a new branch of science—astrobiology (lit. ‘star-life-study’)—despite not a shred of evidence for such life being found in some 50 years of searching. With advances in space-based telescopes, like Kepler, it is widely hoped this situation will soon change.

What is behind this belief in alien life evolving on other planets around other star systems?

It is the rejection of the Creator.

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Professor Caleb Scharf says our world and universe beyond are the remains of intelligent alien life. Credit: calebscharf.com

This means one must explain life on Earth as having arisen spontaneously (and therefore, the reasoning goes, it must also have done so elsewhere in the universe, many millions of times).

But as famous evolutionist (and astrobiologist) Paul Davies has reminded us in a recent Scientific American article,1 leading evolutionists had in past decades opposed this idea of ‘ETs everywhere’.

Why? Because they had faced up to the nigh-insuperable difficulty of trying to imagine a way to have the information systems of reproducing life evolve from raw chemistry.

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Dark matter caused the demise of the dinosaurs?

Dark matter has been invoked to solve many vexing problems in astrophysics and cosmology.1 Now it seems it has been invoked to solve the evolutionists’ problem of extinction of the dinosaurs.2

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Lisa Randall Credit: Wikipedia Public Domain

American theoretical physicist and cosmologist Dr Lisa Randall has developed a breakthrough five dimensional warped geometry theory. About two years ago she proposed a new hypothesis on dark matter which suggests the mysterious invisible substance that allegedly dominates the universe played a role in killing the dinosaurs.3 She even has written a book on it—Dark Matter and the Dinosaurs. In the book her new theory is summarised as follows.

[A]bout 66 million years ago, gravitational perturbations caused by a thin pancake-shaped disc of dark matter in the Milky Way galaxy dislodged icy comets in the Oort cloud at the very edge of the known solar system, resulting in the fiery meteoroid that eventually crash-landed in the Yucatan, leading to the mass extinction of more than 75 per cent of life on the planet in the process.3

Her radical new theory even posits mass extinctions every 35 million years or so.

“I am fully aware that it is speculative,” she says.4

Dinosaurs sell books and she has written a book that needs to be sold.

I’d call it a fairytale, except that might be insulting to fairies. To believe that it could even be true takes a lot of faith, which apparently describes Randall. She is reported to be unfazed by the panoply of uncertainties that her new theory incorporates.4 Continue reading

Will the supermassive black hole at the centre of our galaxy consume us all?

The headline of an online article1 posed this question: “Will Our Black Hole Eat the Milky Way?” It is a good question to ask. Should we, here on Earth, be afraid of the supermassive black hole at the centre of the Galaxy? With it acting like some sort of a super cosmic vacuum cleaner will it eventually suck up our home planet and the rest of the galaxy? The short answer is no. But let’s review why that is so, and you’ll see it is not quite the same answer that a secular astronomer would give.

Our galaxy, called the Milky Way, has a supermassive black hole at its centre. The black hole has a mass of about 4 million times the mass of the sun.2,3 The Galaxy as a whole has a mass of about 20 billion suns (assuming no dark matter4,5), which is about 5,000 times the mass of the super-massive black hole. This makes the mass of the black hole 0.02% of the mass of the whole galaxy. It’s very small but also the stars around the black hole, at the centre of the galaxy, remain in very stable orbits. Few are consumed by the black hole, and those which are, represent a very small consumption of the mass of the whole galaxy as a function of time.

So don’t worry. You have absolutely nothing to worry about. The amount of time it hypothetically would take the black hole to consume the Galaxy is practically longer than the age of the Galaxy, assuming only natural processes of decay, and collision with any nearby galaxies.

Essentially that supermassive black hole, located near Sagittarius A* (see Fig. 1), presents no problem just sitting there at the centre of the Galaxy. The orbits of the stars around it are stable.

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Figure 1: Sagittarius A*. Credit: Chandra

Back in the 1970s, the astronomers Bruce Balick and Robert Brown realized that there was an intense source of radio emissions coming from the very center of the Milky Way, in the constellation Sagittarius. They designated it Sgr A*. The asterisk stands for exciting.1

In 2002, astronomers observed that there were stars zipping past this object, like comets on elliptical paths going around the Sun. Using Newtonian physics the mass of the central object can be calculated from the speeds of the stars orbiting, though Einstein’s relativistic physics is more accurate. So even though the central object could not be seen directly its mass could be calculated. And because of the permissible size that such a central object could be its density can be estimated. The only possible object with such density and gravity to affect the orbital speeds of the observed stars means it must be a black hole. In this case, it worked out that the black hole must have a mass several millions times the mass of our own sun. See Fig. 2. Continue reading