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astronomy Church History History

Biblical chronology II

 THE BIBLICAL — HEBREW YEAR

Jewish calendar Credit: http://www.snipview.com/q/Hebrew_calendar
Jewish calendar
Credit: http://www.snipview.com/q/Hebrew_calendar

The Biblical year is the luni-solar year. It is designated “luni-solar” because this calendar uses the lunar (moon) cycles to determine months and solar (sun) cycles to govern the year. This was the method used by most of the ancient world. Solar years average 365.24219879 days or 365 days, 5 hours, 48 minutes, 45.975 seconds. The revolution of the moon or the completion of a lunar cycle such as the new or full moon varies slightly in length, but averages 29.530587 days. Thus 12 lunar cycles take only about 354 days (354.367056), approximately 11 days less than the length of the solar year.


The following is part 2, a continuation of a summary of a larger work by Dr Floyd Nolen Jones (2001) entitled “The Chronology of the Bible.” This I scanned and converted to text from the back notes in my King James Easy Reading Study Bible (KingWord Press, Humboldt, TN) pp.527-530. Read part 1 first. Editorial comments are in {} brackets and my emphases in bold.


Categories
Church History Creation/evolution History

Biblical chronology I

Chronology is the science of dividing time into regular intervals and assigning dates to historic events in their proper order. Without it, we would find it impossible to understand the sequence of historical events, Biblical or non-Biblical. Chronology is the very foundation on which history rests and is the skeletal framework giving it structure and shape. Indeed, the events of history can only be meaningful and properly understood as long as they are kept in their proper time sequence. If the time sequence becomes altered, the interpretation of the events becomes distorted and no longer dependable. The basic unit of time in chronology is the year.


The following is part 1 of a summary of a larger work by Dr Floyd Nolen Jones (2001) entitled “The Chronology of the Bible.” This I scanned and converted to text from the back notes in my King James Easy Reading Study Bible (KingWord Press, Humboldt, TN) pp.523-527. Editorial comments are in {} brackets and my emphases in bold.


As historical events happened at precise moments of time, the chronologist must exert great care in not creating history while he is endeavoring to recover history. He must fit the events into their exact proper time sequence.