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astronomy Cosmology Creation

Ultramassive galaxy in ‘early universe’ defies naturalistic origins

An artist’s impression of what an ancient star-forming galaxy would look like in visible light. Image credit: NRAO / AUI / NSF / B. Saxton.

February 2020 Sci News reported on this galaxy XMM-2599 discovered about 12 billion light-years away.

Astronomers using the Multi-Object Spectrograph for Infrared Exploration (MOSFIRE) at the W. M. Keck Observatory have discovered an ultramassive galaxy 12 billion light-years away from Earth. The unusual galaxy, named XMM-2599, formed stars at a very high rate and then died; why it suddenly stopped forming stars is unclear.

sci-news.com

Of course this is story-telling at its best. Much of science simply isn’t science. And cosmology is definitely not science!

As I have reported many times in the past, the big bang paradigm is a priori accepted as truth and whatever is discovered is fitted into that story-line. In this case it is another of those objects that is simply too big too early in the alleged history of the big bang universe.

“More remarkably, we show that XMM-2599 formed most of its stars in a huge frenzy when the Universe was less than one billion years old, and then became inactive by the time the Universe was only 1.8 billion years old.”

Dr. Forrest and colleagues used spectroscopic observations from the MOSFIRE instrument to make detailed measurements of XMM-2599 and precisely quantify its distance.

Categories
astronomy Cosmology Physics

Dark energy and the elusive chameleon—more darkness from the dark side

If you thought Dark Matter was strange enough—the new ‘god of the gaps’ in cosmology—the ‘unknown god’ used to force the ‘square peg’ of observational evidence into the ‘round hole’ of the standard big bang theory, then I say you have good reason to think again.

Dark energy is even stranger still. It is allegedly some form of ‘anti-gravity’ energy forcing the Universe apart at an ever faster rate as the Universe gets older. It has arisen from the need to fit theory to observational data that purportedly gives the distance to very distant galaxies as a function of their redshifts.1 Those redshifts are believed to mean that the Universe is expanding, a claim I believe there is sufficient reason to doubt.2-5

NGC4526
Figure 1: Type Ia supernova 1994D in Galaxy NGC 4526 (bottom left bright spot) Credit: NASA/ESA, The Hubble Key Project Team and The High-Z Supernova Search Team

However when two independent teams of astronomers used the Type Ia supernovae as a means of determining the distances of galaxies independently of their redshifts, they both discovered the same thing, that you had to add something else—Dark Energy—to make the big bang theory fit the observational data. I have previously pointed out the implicit circular reasoning in their methods, that is, assume the cosmology you want to prove, use that to select the supernovae you will use in your analysis, then use those supernovae to test your cosmology.4

Dark Energy, I say is just another fudge factor, because the theory is wrong and should have been rejected a long time ago. You might ask, what evidence do I have for such a claim? The actual non-existence of Dark Energy in laboratory physics is evidence for its fudge factor status. As it currently stands it is stuff stranger than fiction—it needs to have physical properties unknown to physics, as we’ll see below. Though that in itself is not necessarily grounds for its rejection, we must remember the origin of the idea—it has only been proposed because of the a priori assumption that the big bang cosmology and history of the Universe is true.6